Monday, September 06, 2010

Globe Knot Bookmark...

I used 1.4mm cord for the 45 face globe knot bookmark, tied over a 1/2" marble, and added a Celtic button knot on the other end.

The globe knot diagram tutorial was originally shared on the IGKT France website, but the direct link has changed at least a couple of times, so if the link isn't working it'll probably just take some looking around to find it again... ;)

There's about 10.5 inches of cord in between them, to fit books up to the average hardback size.

Shown with Strength for Service To God and Country, a book of "Daily Devotional Messages for Those in the Service of Others".

18 comments:

Greg Childree said...

First you don't know me from Adam but I am at your blog at least once a day. Love your work and wanted to say thanks for all you do. I live in the area. Where do you get your 1.9 mm cord? I find para-cord at my local A-N surplus. Thank in advance.

G

Stormdrane said...

I've sourced the smaller diameter cord from mowfugger and Fix My Blinds.

Connor said...

Elegant. Very nice.

Anonymous said...

I just returned from the first weekend of a Wood Badge course where I'm an instructor and passed your blog info on to several others. Some were knotheads like myself and some were just knot challenged.

I enjoy your blog very much and have completed a number of the knots, braclets, lanyards, etc. Keep it up.

Anonymous said...

Hey, just stumbled across your blog. Nice work! Keep it up, ill be following your instructions.

Brigid said...

I linked your blog as a post today. Hope you don't mind.

Would you mind a picture of your stuff on the sidebar with your link that's already up. I just think this is the coolest stuff.

Stormdrane said...

Sure, that's cool. Thanks! :)

Ohno Ohno Ohno said...

Storm: I'm new to the world of knots. I am wanting to make a lanyard to attach to a gun bag that I carry. I was wondering if there is a turks knot that leaves two leads? I am imagining a carabiner attached with a lanyard knot ending in a turks knot around a steel ball bearing. I like the idea of the two leads into the ending "ball". Any thoughts?

Stormdrane said...

You can turn the staring end around and run it under the knot, before tightening, so that it can come out one end, along with the finishing end, giving you to strands work with after tightening up the knot.

Or if you use two colors, both the finishing ends of the strands can be run under the knot and out the other end to work with...

Ohno Ohno Ohno said...

Storm - Have you done an instructional video on how to tie a turks head knot over a sphere? Or a globe knot? I have tried to follow the slide that is refrenced but it's just not happening. Thanks

Stormdrane said...

I've not done a video for a turks head/globe knot tied over a sphere.

They are first tied around a cylinder shaped object, I used a marker/pen for the smaller globe knot. It doesn't look quite as neat as it does in the diagram around the hand.

Then the knot is slid off the cylinder and the ball/marble is inserted, and the long slow process of working the slack out and shaping the knot around the sphere is done.

Ohno Ohno Ohno said...

Storm- Ok....more sucess but another question. I am having more success tying around a marker and then forming the globe. One question....I am using 1.4 mm cord to cover a 1/2 in wooden ball. I can't seem to get a large enough turk to cover the ball. To cover more surface area do I simply increse the number of passes or how do I add another? I am using the guide for a 3L4B turk. Do I increase that for more area or should that cover a 1/2 inch if I increase the number of passes? New to this and do not completely understand the relationship yet between the # of Lines and # of Bights to get the desired result. Thanks for humoring the "rookie".

OhNo

Stormdrane said...

If you can still see the core/ball, adding additional passes should fill the remaining space. Just add one pass to however many you started with, to see how that works, then if needed, add another.

Sometimes the size of the cord and the core/ball may work out just right, in covering an object without leaving any space between the knots crossings or looking bunched up. But sometimes it comes out the other way around.

Lots of variables in the mix, so if one particular knot isn't working after a few tries, try another knot. It can come down to trial and error, and we actually learn from errors(at least sometimes,lol, YMMV), so they're not always a bad thing. ;)

Turks head knots take patience, but it's worth it when they come out right.

Gorth said...

I love your blog and thr Utube videos. Ive learned alot, still working on the turk heads and the globe knot.I have some small cord that looks like it came from a blind and have tied several book marks using monkey fists. That's a very cool idea making a book mark. goina give them out as stocking stuffers.

Gorth

Gorth said...

I found some small cord at my local army surplus store and the have a web site. Lots of colors in 1/16" size on 300' spools. Click on micro rope in the left pane.

Atwood Rope

Gorth

Stormdrane said...

Thanks for the link. :)

I bought some of that cord several years ago, at the local army/navy surplus, but that was also the last time they had it in stock.

I sent a spool to a friend in Iraq, and still have some left on the spools I bought, using it sparingly since I couldn't find it locally anymore.

It's inexpensive utility cord and works fine for decorative knot work.

mschulz said...

After being on your blog a few times I notice the book Strength for Service To God and Country, I’ve never seen it before so I did some reading and decided to ordered it as a Christmas present for my two sons. The oldest is in the Marines and my youngest is planning on joining the Air Force after he graduates High School, thanks for putting it in your blog, I also made a bracelet for myself that I saw on your blog and I think of my sons almost every time I look at it. Thanks and God bless you.

Gorth said...

I found another source on ebay

lotofnothing

Lots od diffrent cords at good prices.

Gorth