Saturday, November 02, 2013

Gemini Twins and Tomahawk time...

Schmuckatelli Co sent me several of their new Gemini Twins skull beads a couple of weeks ago, in pewter, hematite, and antique copper finishes, to try out with some knotting projects.

The first one I used was an antique copper version for a wrist lanyard with a two-strand stopper knot(ABoK #778) on the SOG Tactical Tomahawk, that I bought myself for my birthday last month.

I couldn't stop with just a wrist strap, so also added some more knot work down the length of the handle, but first wrapped it with some Extreme Tape to give the tightened paracord work a better grip on the handle.

I started with a 60 ft length of green paracord, which turned out to be way too much, but I wasn't sure if I was going to double/triple the Turk's head knot or leave it open, so I over-estimated to be on the safe side, hoping it would be long enough for a few different knots and hand grip wrapping.


A three pass Gaucho knot was tied first, at the top of the handle, then I continued on with a single pass of a long 4 bight Turk's head knot(41 lead 4 bight), left in an open lattice pattern, tied another Gaucho knot, coil wrapped the hand grip section, and then another Gaucho knot to just above the handle's lanyard hole.

Before tightening up the hand grip and last Gaucho, I went back with a strand of gutted black paracord to add some stair step stitching, down one side, through the lanyard hole, and back up the other side, then tightened up the Gauchos and grip work to finish.

I ended up using about 35 feet of the green paracord, and since it's in a single strand, it could be untied and re-purposed if needed.

Tomahawk shown attached to my XL Sat-Com Bag(bug-out bag), with a few other odds and ends on the outside, and snacks, water, toilet paper, clean underwear & socks on the inside, cause those might come in handy should a zombie apocalypse scenario erupt in the near future...

A blog reader had asked about continuing the knot work after tying the long Turk's head knot, wondering about how the working end finishes the knot at the standing end, and what I do is run the strand down the center length of the handle underneath the crossings of the TH knot before tightening, so I can continue with more knot work on the handle using the same strand of paracord.  As seen in the added photo of the backside of the tomahawk handle wrap, even with an open lattice pattern, the underlying strand is barely noticeable.

I uploaded a short video to YouTube showing how to tie a two-strand stopper knot, which is knot #778 in 'The Ashley Book of Knots', that I used for the tomahawk's wrist lanyard.

24 comments:

Adrian said...

Whoa, whats that Punisher/Atwood looking thing on your keychain?
Totally dig it!

Stormdrane said...

@Adrian, It's a 'titanium pocket tool', and they can be found on ebay from seller 'tiremet' or Fenix Outfitters stateside.

John said...

Frist off I just gotta thank you for all the time you spend helping everyone , it's awesome! I too was tripping on the titanium pocket tool, and the cable key chain, where did you find it?
Thanks and God bless, John

Stormdrane said...

@John, Do an ebay search for 'titanium pocket tool' and 'cable key ring' and they should show up, available from different sellers.

The cable key rings can also be found on County Comm.

Scot Metcalf said...

Howdy Stormdrane,Really like what you have done with the Tomahawk and the way you have your bug-out bag.As with everything you do it looks very well thought out.I have heard you talk about the extreme tape before,I was wondering how hard it is to tighten and adjust your cord?I was also wanting to know how hard it is to remove if it run pass a wrap?One last thing,any word on if KHWW site is going to come back up? Well Stormdrane thank you and have a good one Scot

Stormdrane said...

@Scot, The extreme tape has a grippy not quite sticky feel to it, so the cord tends to want to stay in place compared to sliding around on a slick surface when working with it.

The tape doesn't have any adhesive on it, when applied you stretch/pull it out as you wrap an object and it grips/fuses to itself when securing it. Removing it is just a matter of peeling it off.

I do not know the current status of KHWW.net being put back up. It's been a couple of weeks since there was last mention of getting things straightened out with it on the KHWW Facebook group.

Jim Lorenzo said...

WOW Stormdrane, I'm very impressed with your BLOG. Very interesting, very informative and very professional. Thank you so much for sharing.

Now, I have a question, where did you get the name Stormdrane? Like a lot of us bikers, I have my own 0 Dinky Dau, but I don't understand the Stormdrane handle!

Take care and have a great week.

Stormdrane said...

@Jim, I chose the name since friends in years past said I had my 'mind in the gutter', with having a somewhat dark sense of humor, so I thought that it made a good fit.

I started using 'Stormdrane' as an online screen name back in the mid 1990's on AOL. Someone else had already used 'Stormdrain', so I just altered the spelling for mine and have used it ever since. :)

sharkbait said...

HaHa glad to finally hear the name story- always was curious but I figured you get asked a billion times a day… bad ass work on the Tomahawk -on the bug out bag, is that a roll of paracord at the top? What's the story with it?

Stormdrane said...

@sharkbait, That's a Drop-Line Rapid Line Deployment System that County Comm produced after seeing my 'paracord carabiner spool' projects from my blog. And my blog post links for making your own.

Dobes said...

I was practicing this wrap on a piece of pvc pip and found that when I finish the long turks head knot my lead end would be back up at the top of the wrap and I needed to run it down thru the turkshead to start the next gaucho knot below. Is that what you did or am I missing a trick. The pictures dont show this but maybe on the backside of the tomohawk. Very cool wrap and I am enjoying working with it.

Stormdrane said...

@Dobes, Just run th working end straight down the handle, underneath the crossings on the long Turk's head knot, so you can continue using the same strand for more knot work.

It will be barely noticeable unless you're looking for it. I'll see about adding a pic of the backside of my tomahawk.

Stormdrane said...

@Scot, You can try typing 'www.khww.net' in your address bar to get to the KHWW page where you can register, or sign in/log in with Twitter/Facebook.

Blogger is not working correctly and giving errors when I try to edit/add/fix the links in my links list, which seems to be an ongoing problem lately with Blogger, wish someone there would fix it... :/

Anonymous said...

Hi Stordrane, just wondering, do you ever use the tomahawk? if so, what for?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I have not yet used the tomahawk, but should the need arise, I'd use it as the tool it is.

A tomahawk is a variation of a hatchet which can be used for cutting, chopping, hammering, poking, prodding, demolition, breaching, throwing(there are competitions for throwing them), or even for self-defense against the zombie hordes in the event of an apocalyptic scenario... ;)

Scot Metcalf said...

Hey Stormdrane,ABOK #778 is a fine looking stopper for such a simple knot.I was wondering when Ashley is showing #780 threw 786 it looks as if he is seizing his cords and then making the knots?Have you ever tried that?Well I will be looking for a video on how you did and extended #782 LOL.Thanks Scot

Stormdrane said...

@Scot, I haven't used seizing before/after knots like in Ashley's diagrams. I have used whipping to secure a short end, securing a sliding knot/loop in place, like the end of a scaffold knot/loop on a monkey's fist key fob.

I know from some of the ABoK diagrams that the seizing was done along the length of twisted/braided rope/lanyard, where he had untwisted the rope to where he wanted to tie a knot, used seizing to to keep it from unraveling further, tied the knot, then the rope would be re-twisted back along the length, leaving the stopper/decorative knot in place. And someone seeing it for the first time would wonder how the heck did that knot get there, lol...

D Jay013 said...

Stormdrane...I have been a fan of yours, always finding inspiration from your work since I started getting into tying knots almost from the start of your blog. I find myself checking back too often to see what's new because your work never ceases to amaze me! After seeing this tomahawk post I found the compact version at my local store and bought one for my next project. Thank you for all you've done and will do!

Anonymous said...

Sir, the cross on the keyring affair has a type of lashing knot and I was wandering if you covered that somewhere. Thank you for your work, it inspires me often.

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, If you're referring to the lashings done on some of the horseshoe crosses, I did a variation of a 'diagonal lashing' around the center sections,starting and ending with constrictor knots.

If it's something else, please be more specific(link) so I know better how to answer. ;)

Anonymous said...

Well sir the link is http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-tEINA8tV0Gs/UnWIqPs6Y7I/AAAAAAAAR14/6AYw4A5veYA/s1600/CIMG7684+1024x.jpg
it is a picture at the end of this article on your blog.

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, Ah, that's the 'Sailor's Cross Knot ', tutorial from knottool.com. I just tied and tightened it directly around the cross whistle.

Anonymous said...

re:the work on the tomahawk. I would really like to do this on the grips of my motorcycle. 1.) can this be done with round leather lacing. 2.) since the clutch side grip can not be removed (just replaced it before finding your youtube videos, just my luck) and I don't want to tackle the throttle side on my own, how would you suggest I tackle this. open to any suggestions. thanks so much.

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, Sure, you could use round leather lacing, but just be aware of how thick it is as knot work will increase the diameter of the grip, and you wouldn't want it so thick that it might be uncomfortable.

Having the hand grips off the bike to tie knot work in hand would certainly be the easiest way to work, but tying directly onto the bike is doable. It just may be a bit awkward/uncomfortable working like that.

Here's a photo of some Harley motorcycle handgrips from one of the folks on the Yahoo! Knottyers group.