Saturday, January 03, 2009

Another weaving method...

A blog reader sent me a link to some hemp knot work and asked if I was familiar with it. It was one of those done with a weaving method(figure 8 with one cord around 2 core strands).

Here I've made an example of one with paracord and a side release buckle. I used a short piece of orange paracord for the core strands and looping onto the buckle ends(about a 2 ft) and figuring the wrist size then making one square knot/cobra stitch to lock the size down. And then I used green paracord to do the weaving around the core strands(about 6 ft).

I didn't take my time with this, so the start/finish may need some tweaking and if done in the same color, you don't notice the buckle connections.

Here's a couple of links to photos, from a previous blog post, showing the weaving method done loose and tightened. You can vary the amount of tension and how tight you knot/weave the cord, as you can when you make various types of paracord bracelets, but you need to do it the same way throughout, start to finish, to keep a uniform look from one end to the other.

Shown with a few other paracord bracelet variations for a size comparison.

(*added 4/1/2009) Ken made a great slide show tutorial on the Instructables website for this method of weaving a paracord bracelet. If the slides are going too fast, just use the pause button and you can stop it and view each photo and move back/forth as needed to follow the tutorial.

40 comments:

Albert A Rasch said...

SD,

All of them are very nice. I especially dig he one on the far left, what is it called?

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Proud Member of Outdoor Bloggers Summit
Southeast Regional OBS Coordinator

Anonymous said...

Do you sell these bracelets?

Stormdrane said...

The one on the left is commonly called a 'king cobra' stitch. It's just making another series of 'cobra stitch/Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet/square knotting' over the first set used as the core.

It can be done with one long strand, two strands for contrasting the colors, or adding a third color to go over a solid or two color core. The amount of cord used for a king cobra paracord bracelet can usually hold between 15-20 feet of cord depending on size and how tight/loose you tie the knots.

You can see an example of the knots being done with this lanyard tutorial.

Stormdrane said...

Anonymous, I used to sell some online, but have gotten away from doing that.

They are lots of folks that do make and sell them online, but I'd suggest trying to make your own. They're really not difficult to make(with a few tutorials floating around) and you'll appreciate having done it yourself.

brianb127 said...

Very nice SD. The second one from the right looks like a snake knot. I have only seen it done in two colors in the past. I was thinking of doing some tutorials in the future (any sugggestions) thanks.

Albert A Rasch said...

SD,
Much obliged!

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Proud Member of Outdoor Bloggers Summit
Southeast Regional OBS Coordinator

Albert A Rasch said...

Thanks SD.

I got another question for you. I need to make a long (12-16 foot) leash for my dog. I would like it squareish or roundish rather than flat.

I can tie my shoelaces pretty good, what do you recommend?

Thanks and Regards,
Albert A Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Proud Member of Outdoor Bloggers Summit
Southeast Regional OBS Coordinator

Stormdrane said...

For a leash, you can try following the boondoggleman.com instructions for the round spiral/diamond braid, using paracord instead of the plastic lace he demonstrates with.

It uses 4 strands making a round shaped ropelike cord, and the spiral/diamond are tied the same way. If using two different colors, how you line them up to start is the difference.

I used about 40 ft of cord(20 ft for each strand) for a six foot long leash, so you'd just double that for a 12 ft long one.

You can use a snap hook, carabiner, etc. for the attachement point. Finishing with turning the braid back on itself for a hand loop. I've used common whipping and the snake knot to finish the loop, but you could also splice the cords and cover that with a turks head knot(a little more difficult, but doable).

Albert A Rasch said...

SD,

Thanks for the excellent and informative answer. I'm going to run out to Walmart and pick up some cordage this week and give it a try.

I finally did a Blogs to Learn From post. You're there, and I've asked everyone to come visit you here.

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Proud Member of Outdoor Bloggers Summit
Southeast Regional OBS Coordinator

Grayson Kelly said...

Hi SD,
I love the new bracelets...as soon as my larger side release buckles get here I'm gonna try some of those. I do have a question for you, I want to make a cross strap for my messenger bag rather than pay $20 for a new one. Im thinking that I'm gonna use the belt keeper idea that you already posted and some kind of woven longer part. My question is, how would I go about make the strap adjustable? Any ideas on that? I don't think i could use a regular plastic clip because I don't think it would slide very well to loosen and tighten. Thanks, Gray

Hovaczech said...

Can you share the hemp work link you mentioned in your post?

Kaiju Images said...

Thanks for the inspiration, Stormdrane!!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaiju_images/3169867077/

Stormdrane said...

Rasch, Thank you, Sir. I've also added your, ''The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles'' to my links list.

Stormdrane said...

Gray, I have tried a few things to make various paracord 'straps' adjustable, but haven't been satisfied with any of those.

Maybe something like the adjustable section of a Slatts Rescue Belt might work. The 'Slatts' link has been down for a while now, and I don't know if it'll come back up. I did find a photo for the adjustable part though, done by using nylon webbing with a carabiner and side release buckle.

photo link

Stormdrane said...

Hovaczech, here's the link for the hemp bracelet I was asked about.

I did a couple of photos showing how I thought it may be constructed with the different colors.

pic 1
pic 2

Shamr0ck said...

SD ~ Can you please post your source for the side release buckles? I'm preparing for weekend session with some boy scouts to introduce them to decorative knot tying and after looking at your post, want to include some basic bracelets in the weekend's activities.

Hope you are well ~

cheers!

Stormdrane said...

Good inexpensive side release buckles can be found at cdwplus.com, the 3/8", 1/2", and 5/8" are the ones I've used and work fine. If you want to double up the cord around the ends, the 5/8" size is good for that.

You can find the ITW Nexus 5/8" contoured ones on ebay.

Anonymous said...

SD,

What is the 2nd one from the left called? It's to the right of the King Cobra. Do you know of a tutorial on that one? Thanks, John (2manyknives on EDC).

Stormdrane said...

That one is an alternate half hitch. I put a tutorial for it on 'instructables'.

Grayson Kelly said...

Hi Stormdrane,
I have a question about the leashes you mentioned. Surprisingly, my coworkers and friends loved the ones I made for my dogs and want me to make them some. I finished the leash by threading the ending crown knots into the weave after I turned it back on itself. Then I used the whipping method you used to add some extra strength to it. Do you think this is enough? I burn the ends. One of my coworkers that wants a leash is wondering if it is strong enough for her dog because apparently she's not good at walking him and pulls alot. Is there a way other than what I described to make sure the hand loop doesn't come undone or do you think I've done it good enough? Thanks.
Gray

Grayson Kelly said...

Hi,
Me again. Two more questions...I know you used 40 ft of cord for the 4 strand leash, but how much would you use for a 6 and 8 strand? (ie how much of each color for 6 and 8)
Thanks again
Gray

Stormdrane said...

It sounds like it may work out alright as you finished it. For the strongest finish, you'd make an eye splice for the handle, working the ends into the leash. For those that are good at splicing(I'm not... yet) it may look good leaving it like that, but for my attempts at splicing, I finish by covering it with something like common whipping, a long turks head, or a few short turks heads in a row.

Stormdrane said...

I actually have no idea for the exact lengths that would be needed for 6 and 8 strand versions for a leash, but if I can figure it out, I'll pass that info along. ;)

Grayson Kelly said...

Hi Stormdrane,
I actually answered my own question..20 ft of cord per color is fine for the 6 and 8 strand. You'd think it wouldn't be but it was. Thanks for all your help.
Gray

Stormdrane said...

Glad to help when I can. Math always throws me, that's why I dropped out of college 20 years ago. :)

A320Filtros said...

Stormdrane;
How do you tie the bracelet you have pictured. The one I'm interested in is the 2nd from the top on the right had side. It looks more rounded then the others.

Thanks

Stormdrane said...

That one is the snake knot. Start with a small loop, do the snake knot, finish with a lanyard knot. Or to use with a side release buckle, loop onto one half of the buckle, do the snake knot for the length needed, then run the cords around the second part of the buckle and tie a cobra stitch/Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet to finish.

Anonymous said...

Which type of knot method out of all of the ones you've shown uses the MOST cord? Awesome blog.

Stormdrane said...

The king cobra stitch(doubled Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet) uses the most cord.

andrew said...

Great post, and great blog. Thanks for all of the info.

Do you have - or can you point me to - instructions on how to tie the pattern for the bracelet just to the left of the MedicAlert brace. (It's the lightest tan one I'm referring to.)

Many thanks,

Andy

Stormdrane said...

That one is a woven method. I put up an Instructable for that one.

Anonymous said...

How do you start a cobra stitch with two seperate colors? Is there any videos that show how this is done.

Thanks,
Phillip

Stormdrane said...

For two colors, you sew/melt/or glue two colors of paracord together, then tie as you would with a single color strand. The connected section will be hidden under the knots.

Link:

http://gallery.polartactical.com/v/tutorial/550cord/2tone550/

Anonymous said...

Thanks, I am very impressed with your site. It inspires me. I've always been fascinated with rope and knots but was afraid to try it fearing it was to hard.

Phillip

Anonymous said...

Great website!!! On your 1/3/2009 blog "Another weaving method" you show a number of weaving patterns. I'm interested in the second bracelet from the left in the second image. Are there instruction within your blog site?

Stormdrane said...

That's 'alternate half hitching', and there's a link, a few comments up, for an 'instructable' I made on tying that one(1/08/2009).

shannon said...

ok im not sure if you take requests but i found a cobra style bracelet on ebay that i had never seen before it is a alternating color pattern leaving a ribbon type look, what is this called and do you have a how to on it..the link

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=310297663988&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

Stormdrane said...

@Shannon, The bracelet is the usual cobra stitch/Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet type first done in all white paracord, then they took a strand of pink and simply wove it up though the edge of the bracelet, across the middle, through the other edge, back around over the middle, down the other edge, and repeat.

You can see how the pink is sitting on top of the the knot work if you look carefully. Hope that helps. ;)

Anonymous said...

Stormdrane,

Could you do a viedo on how you do the bracelet to the left of the one with the medical tag on it? I have tryed several times and went to the Instructables web site and the You Tube site and its still not comming out right.

Thanks

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, If you can't get the hang of the woven version, give the 'Trilobite' or 'Ladder Rack' knots a try. They look similar to the woven version when finished, but use two working ends instead of one.