Friday, April 16, 2010

Boot knife handle wrap...

I used a single 15 foot length of black 1.4mm braided nylon string to wrap the boot knife handle.

I started with a 3 lead 5 bight turks head knot with three passes. I then ran the cord up to the end of the handle and through the lanyard hole, back down to the turks head knot, where I worked it over/under one of the bights, and then started wrapping the cord around the handle. I went under the cords running up the handle for a turn, then over the cords, alternating the wrap towards the end. I made another 3 lead 5 bight turks head knot over the handle's lanyard hole to finish the wrap.

17 comments:

grangerknives said...

Exceedingly cool!
Very fine work sir!

Rich said...

That is really nice! I am always so impressed with your work. Please keep it up, it is very inspiring!

Albert A Rasch said...

Beautiful, just beautiful!

Best Regards,
Albert
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Reviewing the Nikon Monarch 8X42

acercanto said...

Very nice job! I love trying out the different knots and stuff you post. Any chance you could furnish where you got that knife?

Thanks!

Stormdrane said...

I bought that particular boot knife at the uniform shop on Ft. McPherson, in the early 1990's.

It's a common dagger design, and you can duplicate the knot work on a similar shaped knife grip/handle, cane, staff, flashlight, etc...

Having the lanyard hole on the end of the handle made it easier to run the vertical cord up one side and down the other. But, it can also be done with separate cords, using as many or few as you want, and weave over and under them as you wrap another cord from one end to the other. The turks heads will cover the ends of the strands.

Anonymous said...

That would be cool if you did the full coxcombing technique instead on the handle. That technique would give a little more grip.

Anonymous said...
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ZombieSquad said...

That's sexy. Nice work and thanks for sharing, Stormdrane!

-Kyle

Joshua said...

Couple of questions... how do you tighten up the turks head knots, and where do you hide the ends?

Stormdrane said...

After loosely tying the turks head knot, I make additional passes, then go back and gradually work the slack out from the start all the way through each of the passes. This sometimes requires doing two or three times, which is the time consuming part of making turks head knots.

After the knot is tight, the starting end is trimmed and tucked under the end bights. The other end of the cord is usually run under the knot after the last pass was done and comes out the other side of the turks head. If more knot work is to be done, you continue tying from there. If you're finished with just the turks head, you trim and tuck the end under a bight.

When you've tied them neatly and kept everything lined up and straight, it's hard to find the start or finish of the knot, and that's the goal of tying them right.

Anonymous said...

your work is wonderful! i do have a quick question,assuming the turks head at the base of the hande is still part of the same cord s the entire handle, how did you do it??

Stormdrane said...

It is all one strand, tied just as described in the post. When you tie a turks head knot, you have the start and finishing end, and the finishing end can be run under the knot, before tightening, to come out the other side of the knot to continue with more knot work.

Anonymous said...

thank you very much!

Anonymous said...

How do you finish with the turks head after the lashing on the handle? I finished the wrap thru the lanyard hole, and from there I went knots!!! Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. The issue I have is how to switch from the working end of the wrap to the bitter end of the turks head knot.

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, Since I used one continuous length of cord, after making the third pass on the final turk's head knot at the lanyard hole, the working strand goes alongside the standing end and out underneath the knot, then is trimmed and tucked to finish. Hope that helps. ;)

Anonymous said...

im not sure I understand the actual wrapping of the handle could you describe that with more detail?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, It's all one strand of cord, after the first Turk's head knot is tied at the hilt end of the knife, the working end goes up the side of the knife handle, through the lanyard hole, then back down the other side of the handle.

The strand is run through one of the bights of the Turk's head knot, then is coiled back up around the knife handle, and alternately goes over/under the strand that runs vertically on both sides of the handle until you reach the lanyard hole, then another Turk's head knot is tied to finish.