Thursday, May 13, 2010

Star knot and loop bracelet...

This is a type of knotted 'sailor's bracelet'.

I started with three strands of 1.4mm nylon cord, about 10 ft long each, which was more than I needed. I found the center of the cords, moved about an inch or so off to the side from that, and started a three strand crown sennit back towards the center for a couple of inches. I brought the ends together, making the loop, then continued with crown sennits with three paired strands, for the length I wanted. 

A six strand star knot was then tied at the end(here's another star knot tutorial). With a separate strand, I added a small turks head knot at the base of the loop.

Similar examples of these kind of bracelets can be seen on the Frayed Knot Arts website, in the 'Jewelry' section. It's a good site to explore and there are some various knotting tutorials linked there too. Here's a link for a photo of a nice one made by the late Bud Brewer.

14 comments:

Jill said...

Beautiful!!
I've gotten away from knot work... I might have to attempt a star knot soon.

orel said...

me gusta mucho ,perocfalta el tutorial
marvlo

Lil Bean said...

I found your blog via a google search for decorative knots. I've never learned more than the basic tie your shoe knot, but I'm looking for something pretty specific now - might you be able to help me out? Here's my project: http://ravel.me/LilBean/rswzp
If you have any ideas, would you please help me out? Thanks so much!

Stormdrane said...

Lil Bean, There are many different types of 'bends', knots that join two rope/cord ends, that could be used for the strap.

I'd probably use a double or tripled overhand, tied with each strand around the other, also known as a fisherman's knot/bend.

Stormdrane said...

orel, I only used a couple of knots for the bracelet, the crown sinnet(3 strand also called a triangle stitch) tied and brought the ends together forming the loop, now six strands are paired off(3 double strands) and the same crown sinnet is tied for the length, and finish with the star knot, which a tutorial is linked to in the post.

Lil Bean said...

thanks! :)

War-Pig said...

Great post as usual Stormdrane. I ALWAYS enjoy seeing what you create. A question though. Why not do a 6-strand crown sennit instead of doubling up the cords?

I started one of these and when I got down to joining the loop, I decided to try my hand at making a 6-strand crown sennit. It's tough getting it started, but as long as you have a few different colors cordage, it makes it easier. As soon as I'm finished with it, I'll send you a link to the pic.

A cool thing that I did with a 4-strand crown sennit lanyard for my new Byrd Robin knife was about halfway through the braiding, I reversed direction. So it looks like the different colors go around one time, touch, then reverse direction. Cool effect.

Keep 'em coming friend. You are a great inspiration for a lot of folks.

pawan said...

great knot turorial.
A lot of stuff regarding knot are expalined at knots.

toten said...

Wonderful work. But sailors don;t wear "bracelets", Mr Stormdrane.
They wear "BRO-slets".
Insert anguished groans here.

Stormdrane said...

The bracelet with the star knot was a gift for my mom. ;)

The FrayedKnotArts website mentioned that women usually wear the star knot versions, and men often choose the ones finished with the manrope knot, although either is fine. If Popeye wore one, I wouldn't laugh at him, lol.

I most often wear a paracord Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet/cobra stitch/square knot type, with my medic alert tag on it.

Yvonne said...

I am SO inspired! I really want to attempt this bracelet. And I would like to make more jewelry type items. I have searched for nylon cord but there are so many choices. Can you tell me who is the best to use for this purpose.

Thanks so much for the new project idea! As if I need another :)

Stormdrane said...

The smaller diameter nylon cord that I use, came from ebay seller 'mowfugger'.

Neil said...

The 'half round' braid ABOK#3003 used at http://www.frayedknotarts.com/tutorials/chesapeake/chesa.html is an interesting alternative.

Stefanos Fanidis said...

Neat work!