Sunday, June 13, 2010

Vertical half hitching paracord pouch/can koozie...

I used a 30 foot length of orange paracord, with a couple of feet of black reflective paracord for the cinch cord with a cord lock, to make this paracord pouch/can koozie with vertical half hitching.

The vertical half hitching is almost the same as regular half hitching, but you hitch around the previous hitch instead of the cord between the hitches, which makes the vertical columns with the cord stretched between them. It makes a snug fit around a soda/beer can as a koozie, and also is a good fit as a pouch for my LED lantern. This was another example of various hitching techniques, shown in 'Creative Ropecraft' by Stuart Grainger.

My friend, Manny, emailed me about checking page 108 of 'The Marlinspike Sailor' by Hervey Garrett Smith, for a reference of the hitching. I checked my copy and sure enough there's a drawing of a water jug covered with the same type of hitching and a description of the process, but Smith calls it 'French Hitching' in his book, where I'm more familiar with that name applied to a spiraling/twist type of hitching knot work.

In an older Smith book, 'The Arts of the Sailor', it's referred to as fender hitching, because of its use in making boat fenders. Another example of knot work going by different names, which can get a bit confusing sometimes.

36 comments:

Anonymous said...

Did the book show how to make this? I dare ask but would be really interested on how you made it. Awesome job.

wasomma said...

wow I love how it keeps its shape, I will give this one a shot

Stormdrane said...

There are just a couple of drawings/diagrams of the vertical half hitching, not a start to finish type project. Enough to understand what's being done, with having seen and done other types of hitching.

It's the same with a lot of knot books, where you learn a knot, braid, sinnet, or weave, and then you apply that knowledge to make something with it.

If I find a good online link to show the process, I will add it to the post.

Tom Trocine said...

These are soo cool! I can't wait to try making one of these Thanks for posting the info and pictures.

Clive said...

how about some vertical cow hitching?

Calvin said...

Holy awesome! Just discovered your blog via instructables, and its killer! I've been into paracord lately...this is cool!

Instructables user: nepheron

If you want to see some cool stuff, check out my blog http://crystalfacet.wordpress.com/

tiki_ink said...

I was hoping you could provide some information on how to start the hitching on the bottom of the bottle. Is there a youtube video or explanation that you could right up? thanks.

Stormdrane said...

The hitching on the bottom is done by hitching the loops between the hitches. This will spiral towards the center of the bottom of the can/bottle. You can skip every other one, or do double hitches, etc... to vary the pattern on the bottom.

Bound For Cory said...

Very cool design! How many feet do you think you would need to do one of the normal size klean kanteens?

Stormdrane said...

A stainless steel or aluminum water bottle would probably use up a 50 foot hank of paracord, maybe more, to cover it...

Anonymous said...

I Love This Knot!!!!!But I just wanted To Let everyone know that you can get the vertical hitching tutorial that Stormdrane is talking about here: http://www.amazon.com/Marlinspike-Sailor-Hervey-Garrett-Smith/dp/0070592187/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277701648&sr=1-1#reader_0070592187

Just click on the book picture and search the book for "French Hitching" =)

Cheers,
Captinmyers@yahoo.com

Il Simon One said...

hi stormdrane
wonderful execution!!!
exctly, you spoke about 2 books, 'Creative Ropecraft' by Stuart Grainger and page 108 of 'The Marlinspike Sailor'... where do you have found the references to make that pouch? in what book?

thanks
regards

Simon

Stormdrane said...

The books I mentioned merely show the hitching, which is typically done around bottles. Using the knotwork for paracord pouches and can koozies was my own idea, and I've not seen them used in that manner previously.

Hitching has been around for a very long time, so I wouldn't doubt it's been used in any number of ways besides covering bottles, but if there are examples available in any texts, I'm not aware of them.

Il Simon One said...

Hi
thanks for informations.

Another question: from the images i didn't understand something, you used only 1 orange rope, right? so if i look at the finish work i will see the rope turning around the bottle as a spiral, or not? I mean, what is the direction of the rope? from the black rope to down or from the black rope to the right?
thanks again

regards

Simon

Stormdrane said...

I tied onto the black cinch cord and started hitching from left to right. You're working your way around the can. It does spiral, but the spiraling isn't visually noticeable until you reach the bottom, where it spirals to the center.

Il Simon One said...

hi stormdrane

mayne i finally understood how to make this knot
i made a video
can you check it and tell me if is ok?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCnKiQgIVGM
sorry for bad english :P

Stormdrane said...

Yes, you have the basics down, in your video for tying the vertical half hitching/fender hitching. :)

Il Simon said...

finally i understood it!!! thanks Stormdrane for help and for your wonderful blog

but now i've another question about the closing... can you explane me how you closed the tie?

thanks
regards

Simon

Stormdrane said...

If you mean closing the top, like when used as a pouch, you just slide the cord lock up against the hitches to close the top, slide the cord lock back and spread the hitches out to open.

If you meant finishing the bottom, you just do half hitching, which will spiral towards the center, to finish. You can vary the pattern by skipping every other hitch, or doubling up on hitches, etc... A double half hitch can be used to finish, then trim excess cord and maybe a drop of super glue, or needle and thread to further secure the end.

B.J. said...

I just wanted to pass on a neat trick that I happened upon. I have been using a short cobra stitch (approx. 4 turns/passes)as an adjustable cord lock/cord keeper. The cord keeper tension can be adjusted with the amount of tension used to tie the knots, and number of completed knots used. Also I wanted to say Thank You for the great blog, and your willingness to pass on information and skill.

Matt said...

Thanks Stormdrane, I enjoy your blog very much! My first attempt at this pouch. I feel it was easier than the half-hitched pouch once I got the work-flow down. I will do a step by step on the next one I make.

Finished Vertical hitched Can Koozie!

Anonymous said...

Hey Stormdrane! I like this one a lot! I think I'll stick with these exclusively, since they look cool and they go pretty quickly. One question. Why do you prefer the drop stitch vs just continuing the vertical hitch on the bottom?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I prefer dropping stitches/half hitching on the bottom as I like the way it looks and habit. You can try to continue the same vertical hitching if you have room to do so...

Anonymous said...

I can dig it, just curious. Thanks. I tried doing a two-color vertical hitch too. Started with the cinch loop at the top, tied the silver to one side of the cinch and the blue to the other (my buddy's a Dallas fan). Working in opposite directions seemed to be going ok, crossing with an X at opposite sides of the can twice (once under the cinch, once opposite). The problem I ran into was pulling the silver loosened the blue, and vice versa. Ever tried a two-color in this pattern? hw

Anonymous said...

Also, the vertical hitching all the way down seems to work fine for me, and I like the look. Think I'll stick with it. hw

Stormdrane said...

@hw, I haven't tried a two color version, but it may certainly be possible. There's usually lots of trial and error to see if different ideas will work, and even if it doesn't, it can still be a positive learning experience. ;)

Chapman said...

I tried this, but I have a problem with keeping the hitches tight and the koozie stretches and changes shape when I pull it on or off. Did you have that problem?

Thanks for your blog and sharing your hobby with all of us!

Stormdrane said...

@Chapman, Mine kept their shape and didn't loosen up. It could be the cord you're using, or maybe try it with the hitches closer together, less spacing between them.

The paracord I used had a somewhat stiff/solid feel to it with a round cross section, compared to some paracord that can feel soft and flattens out with a loose outer sheath over the inner strands, which can sometimes affect a project.

Anonymous said...

Great pouch. By chance you have a tutorial for this project?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I've not done a tutorial on the vertical half hitching. Simon posted a video showing the basic process, and if you understand basic half hitching and how it's used, it becomes clearer to figure out how to apply it to making a bottle covering/pouch/koozie.

Craig Hessing said...

here is a two color paracord Koozie

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=288857097943568&set=pcb.288857817943496&type=1&theater

Terri Grothe said...

Stormdrane, Hi I'm really confused. I see how to do the vertical half hitch but how do you space it? Can't seem to find anything. I did check the video that II simon one posted on youtube but didn't get the cord he wrapped up top and it wasn't complete. Can you help maybe??
I'm really new to this. Like a week doing it.
Thank

Stormdrane said...

@Terri, When you start the vertical hitching, either tying the cord to itself or using a cinch cord, example of cow/ring hitching start, those first hitches around the top are spaced as you like, either close together are spaced apart and you keep that spacing throughout as you work.

Terri Grothe said...

Hate to be a pest. Just so I understand. I can do my half hitch, pull the cord evenly space then add another half hitch at the spacing I want right? again so sorry to bother you.

Stormdrane said...

@Terri, Yes, space them as you like, right next together or spaced out, and when you come around again you hitch around the hitch above it creating the vertical hitch, and you just keep whatever spacing you started with the same as you go.

Terri Grothe said...

Stormdrane You ROCK!!! Thank you for all your help!