Saturday, December 04, 2010

Paracord and Leather Turks Head Knot Firesteel Fob/Lanyard...

For this pocket knife fob/lanyard, I used a length of gutted camo green paracord and tucked a 1/8" by 2" long misch metal mouse firesteel into the paracord sheath.

I tied a Celtic button knot on one end and worked the firesteel down against it.

I then tied a 17 lead 4 bight turks head knot of a single pass, with round 2mm dark brown leather over the paracord covered firesteel. Added a copper colored bead(from Hobby Lobby) and tied a scaffold/multiple overhand sliding knot to finish.

The pocket knife is a Victorinox Tinker. My previous post with with firesteel fobs/lanyards is linked here.

Here's a couple of the firesteels with a single strand of paracord in a two bight turks head knot, using less than 2 feet of paracord. To be worn as a pendant on a chain, a zipper pull, or added to a key ring.

And one using 3 feet of paracord as a lanyard for a Swiss Army knife...

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

welcome back, glad your better been missing my knot post..

mbick said...

That is such a gorgeous work! Thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

Great work. Your video tutorials are excellent-really helpful. What's the music you used on the lanyard knot video?

Thanks,

Alex

Stormdrane said...

@Alex, the YouTube audioswap music for the lanyard knot video is The Tar Baby' by Ryan Kickland.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for that. Great music.

Alex

Anonymous said...

Nice work. I also liked the past post on fire steel. I do have a question. Is the steel there as an emergency use only item or can it be accesed readily for daily use? Am I missing something?

Ed D.

Stormdrane said...

@Ed D, firesteels that are tucked into knot work are usually for emergency use, if other fire starting tools, like a lighter or matches aren't available when needed.

The way this one was tied, it can be worked out after untying the scaffold knot, and worked back in place, but it wouldn't be quick and easy.

This firesteel is fairly thin and small, but still works. There are many different sizes available, even some with fixed handles made of wood or bone. Some knife sheaths are even made to accommodate a firesteel alongside a fixed blade, for those that use them often.

Anonymous said...

Glad to hear you are feeling better. I was wondering if you had any tips / tricks / suggestions on making the long turks head knot used in this as well as your 10/18 and 10/10 postings? I have tried the tutorial you linked to a few times. I tend to better with moving visuals as apposed to still images, so was just wondering if you had some suggestions of what to pay attention to more or where else I could look? Beautiful work by the way!

Zelig

Stormdrane said...

@Zelig, When increasing a two bight turks head knot into a four bight, you have to pay close attention to the over and under sequence in Bud Brewer's tutorial, especially where the over 2 under 1 cords go.

Some folks mess up at the ends where you go up over one bight then down over the bight next to it, then under... It's there in Bud's tutorial, and if that's where you've had trouble, when you see it, you get that 'Ah ha!' moment when you figure it out.

Rory said...

David,

Great Job! I am trying myself to find a good way to incorporate a firesteel and compass onto the "survival" bracelets. I picked up some of the whistle buckles and have made a few with them. Looks like even the smallest firesteel blanks need to be cut smaller. I am guessing the only way to incorporate the steel into the bracelet is to cut them smaller and lash over it with the stitches.Either that or make a sheath as you have done and lash it onto the bracelet somehow. :)

udorn73 said...

kudos great work as always

Merry Christmas!

Anonymous said...

Thanks Stormdrane I see what you mean. I see and get it. This is a great Fob/Lanyard Great for EDC and safety.

Thanks, Ed D.

Anonymous said...

I took your ideas and modified them, by placing the fire steel in the gutted 550 cord and tying the celtic knot on one end like you explain, then I simply leave about 4 inches of cord, which I then tie on to the zipper of my hunting and ski coats, I also tied one on my keyring. The zipper pulls as I call them, make it easier to operate with glove or mittens and it is always with me. Thanks for your outstanding site, I have learened so much.

Anonymous said...

Hello,
Thanks for all your posts. I have a question: What flashlights are noted in the 2/10 and 2/17 pictures?
Thanks.

Russ

Stormdrane said...

@Russ, The flashlights in those posts are a Jetbeam C-LE V2, and a Streamlight Keymate.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

great article.
what size paracord you were using to fit the 1/8" steel inside? 4mm?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I've used 550 and 450 gutted paracord to fit in the 1/8" x 2" firesteels and with the slight variations in diameter from different paracord manufacturers, the 1/8" firesteels still fit inside all of them.

4mm, 5/32", 3/16" is the usual range in diameter for mil-spec and commercial grade 550 paracord.

The next size up in firesteels was 3/16" and it was too tight/snug a fit with the paracord I had.

Ewan said...

Hi, do you have a tuutorial for the knot in the picture with a quarter coin?

Stormdrane said...

I do have a tutorial for a two-bight Turk's head knot lanyard, with that being the same knot that is used with the firesteel fob, just with a single pass, using a two foot length of gutted paracord with a 1/8" firesteel tucked in one end, then the two-bight Turk's head knot tied around it, add a split ring, then the working end is tucked down through the center of the knot out the other end, tighten the knot up and trim the excess.