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Saturday, September 22, 2012

A video tutorial for tying a long 4 bight Turk's head knot...


I often reference Bud Brewer's photo tutorial on the Knot Heads World Wide website for folks that want to learn how to tie a 'long 4 bight' Turk's head knot, but from many of the emails, questions, and comments I've received, not everyone is successful in duplicating the knot.  Hopefully this video offers enough to help those that need it...

These knots can take a bit of patience in completing them, where start to finish times can easily take hours.  A few process photos or minutes of video can only help you get started, and the real work comes in spending time straightening out a knot, making additional passes, and keeping everything neat as you gradually work the slack out.

Many a time I've gotten well into a knot, to realize it's not going to end up as neat as I want it, and I'll untie the whole mess and start over.  Those moments can get aggravating, and you might find yourself worked up and hoppin' mad like Yosemite Sam, so take your time and try to do it right the first time. ;)

I tied a long 4 bight TH around the handle of the pictured scratch awl, making one pass each with white and red paracord.  The tool also comes in handy used as a marlinspike or fid for rope work.

I used a Perma Lok Super Jumbo Lacing Needle with the paracord, to tie the knot in the video.  They do make it much easier to work Turk's head knots, and some other paracord projects like needle hitching and weaving when tying on, around, or to attach things with your EDC gadgets, gear, and gizmos...

Some more info with long 4 bights as bracelets and lanyards available in this previous blog post.  And you could also make a 4 bight lanyard with a single strand of paracord, like was shown in the two bight lanyard tutorial I made three years ago.



 

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Stormdrane, thankyou for taking the time to do this tutorial. I have tried this knot several times, and I was not able to figured this knot. I appreciate you took the time to show this in your blog. I am sure much of your fallowers will benefit from this tutorial. Specially those who are having a hard time figuring this knot. Like myself! hehe ;-)

Peace,
Manny.

Unknown said...

Outstanding tutorial. Thank you.

Marte Martinez said...

great tutorial, how did you make the paracord core with side release buckles if i may ask ?

Stormdrane said...

@Marte, I looped the center of a length of paracord onto one buckle end, pulled the two paracord strands through the finished Turk's head knot that had been previously tied around a drinking straw, then ran the strands around the other buckle end and sewed them in place at wrist sized length.

The Turk's head knot will extend/contract to fit the bracelet length, and can be further tightened up, or left in an open pattern, where a little needle and thread through the end bights and paracord will further secure it. Hope that makes sense. ;)

Anonymous said...

Stormdrane: I did the long 4 bight Turk's Head Knot. It's such a gorgeous knot. I loved it, and I had lots of fun making this particular knot. It's so elegant, and you can use it in different items up to including tools. Thankyou so much again for this tutorial. :-)

Peace,
Manny.

Brigid said...

I made my very first paracord bracelet using one of your videos. It made it quite easy. thanks!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for providing us with all the information!

Rattlesnake Jake said...

SD -

Like the others, your tutorials are spiffy. My problem is that I would like to tie such a long Turk's Head on something that I cant turn over as easily as a legnth of PVC pipe (to wit - I want to cover the handle of my Weber charcoal starter chimney.

Any thoughts?

Jake

Stormdrane said...

@Rattlesnake Jake, If the handle is removable with screws/bolts and not riveted in place, I'd take it off to do the wrapping, which would make it considerably easier.

It can be awkward working with long lengths of cord and tying around something like a luggage handle on a suitcase, or fixed objects like stair rails, lamp post, vehicle steering wheel, etc.. where you can't rotate the object in hand while you work.

It ends up with you doing the bending, stooping, standing, and twisting to see the work as you proceed, and isn't as enjoyable as tying while sitting in a recliner in front of the TV, lol... ;)

Gregor Greiner said...

Stormdrane, thank you for this tutorial. Got it figured on the first try. How do you recommend finishing and tucking the ends?

Stormdrane said...

@Gregor, Finishing can vary depending on the project, what the knot is covering and the type of cord used, but generally before tightening, I run the working end up under the knot and out the other side, then tighten the knot, and trim/tuck both the standing/starting strand and working end where they are.

If you need to further secure those ends, a little strategic glue or needle & thread can be used, or melting(synthetic cords) on the inner side of the knot where it won't be visible, like when I've used a Turk's head knot for a bracelet/lanyard and have access to the inside after removing the knot from a mandrel...

Unknown said...

Great video. I was actually able to make it this time, the pictures a khww had always left me confused for this one.

Abraham Craig said...

Awesome tutorial, this was my first foray into any kind of decorative knot and after quite a few pauses and only 3 tries SUCCESS!

I tied it with 3 passes with some grey poly rope around the handle of a big 3 cell Mag lite and it looks really cool.

Looking forward to trying this ona walking stick.